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Gun Review: Century Arms Golani Sporter

Gun Review: Century Arms Golani Sporter/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cda6e010_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cda6e010_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Golani Sporter rifle, reliable while using a .223 cartridge. Century International Arms, widely recognized as the largest importer of surplus firearms and ammunition, has come out with a semi-auto only version of the famous Israeli Galil rifle in .223 Rem./5.56x45mm – the Golani Sporter. Named after Israel’s Golani Brigade which first tested this rifle, the design of the original military Galil rifle (and thus the Golani Sporter) was a cross largely between the AK-47, the M16 and the FN-FAL. Essentially the rifle’s designer, Israel Galil, attempted to incorporate the legendary reliability of the AK-47 while using the .223 cartridge. The result was the adoption of Galil’s design by the Israeli military in 1972. Produced by Israel Military Industries (IMI), the original Galil rifle was made in several variations, including: a version with folding bipod and carrying handle; Galil assault rifle without bipod or carry handle, a short five-inch barrel variation, a Micro-Galil and a heavy-barreled sniper model. Most were chambered for 5.56mm NATO but some were also made in 7.62x51mm (.308 Winchester). The Israelis’, however, while pleased with the performance of the Galil rifle, soon phased it out of use in favor of the M16 and CAR-15 rifles supplied by the United States at cut-rate prices through foreign aid programs. Design Elements At first glance, it is noted that the Golani Sporter, as distributed by "Century International Arms" , incorporates some of the best and handiest features of the original Galil. It has a sturdy tubular steel folding stock for example, as well as a strong, long-life milled receiver. The fixed operating handle is mounted vertically, allowing it to be ergonomically operated by either the right- or left-hand. The ambidextrous side safety is located for convenient thumb access on the left side of the receiver above the pistol grip. It is connected to the traditional sheet metal AK safety selector on the right side of the receiver, so the safety can be operated from either side of the rifle. The rear sight, containing a protective housing, is mounted on top of the receiver cover and is fitted with an “L” shaped, flip-type aperture offering both a 300m and 500m zero. The windage and elevation adjustable AK-style front post sight is adjustable up or down with an AK sight tool. Windage adjustment is performed by loosening and tightening two opposing screws that move the front sight assembly within its dovetail notch. The front sight housing also is provided with a post flip-up night sight, although due to age, the tritium lamps are no longer functional. There is also a scope rail machined into the left side of the receiver to allow optics mounting. Related GunDigest Articles Review: Century Arms RAS47 Tactical Shotgun: Mossberg Flex Review Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling Since the Golani Sporter's handguard is mounted so that it does not touch the rifle’s American-made 16.25-inch chrome moly barrel, it allows for greater air circulation around the barrel, resulting in a cooler barrel, even during sustained firing – not to mention greater accuracy. Additionally, the interior of the handguard is lined with an aluminum heat shield to keep it comfortable to hold during prolonged firing. While some shooters prefer a chrome-lined barrel, Century Arms conservatively estimates that the Golani’s chrome molly barrel can easily yield a useful life of 12,000-rounds before requiring replacement. With its twist rate of 1-9”, the Golani can readily handle all varieties of .223/5.56 ball ammo. The barrel is also fitted with a birdcage-type flash suppressor and a bayonet lug. At the gun’s other end, the Golani’s heavy, tubular folding stock provides a solid rest against the shoulder and securely folds out of the way when needed, allowing the rifle to be more easily transported, packed, or carried. The combination of the nearly 8-1/4 pound weight of the rifle and its barrel mounted muzzle brake work with the low –impulse .223/5.56mm cartridge to render felt recoil negligible, if at all. Another thoughtful feature of the Golani is that it is fitted with side-mounted sling swivels, positioned on the opposite side of that of the operating handle. This allows the rifle to lie flat and comfortably out of the way when slung across the back. Finally, the Golani leaves nothing to be desired in the firepower arena, as it comes with two 35-round magazines. The heavy steel construction of these mags make them nearly indestructible. Built from a combination of new and surplus parts along with a durable matte parkerized finish, the Golani Sporter’s overall construction is extremely robust, solid as a tank, and made to last. The Golani is actually easier to disassemble and reassemble than an AK. How the Golani Rifle Functions When the rifle is fired, gases from the burning propellant powder enter the gas tube and push the gas piston and bolt carrier rearward. This backward movement causes the bolt to rotate and move rearward allowing the empty cartridge case to be pulled backward out of the chamber by the extractor. As it moves, the cartridge case is pushed out of the ejection port by the ejector. At the same time, the hammer is automatically re-cocked and re-engaged with the trigger sear. After compression by the bolt carrier and bolt, the return spring expands and forces the bolt carrier and bolt forward. During its travel, the bolt strips a cartridge from the magazine and feeds it into the barrel’s chamber as the extractor catches the cartridge’s case rim. At the end of the parts’ movement, the bolt is locked (by spring pressure) against the breech.

Gun Review: Remington 1100

Gun Review: Remington 1100

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379ce089324_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379ce089324_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Broken forearms are common on the Remington 1100 due to the thin wall of the stock, so check things over before you buy. Hundreds of thousands of these popular shotguns have been sold over the decades, and the reason for that is simple: they are good guns. But is that used Remington 1100 being sold for a song, or to a sucker? Here are a few things to check. Remington’s 1100 self-loading shotgun has seen a lot of changes over the years, some fairly major and some minor, though important nonetheless. If you’re in the market for a used one during the current Obama-pression, it’s a good idea to check on a few things before you hand over portraits of my favorite president, Ben Franklin. Here’s what to look for Before You Buy: Getting Started As you unscrew the magazine cap, always be prepared for the magazine-spring retainer to be missing. If it is, the magazine spring can shoot the cap more than 20 feet and damage whatever it hits. Even if the retainer is in place, the spring has been known to come out on its own after the cap is removed. Something to watch for. Rust in the extractor-plunger hole can create ejection problems and ultimately cause the destruction of the breech bolt. It’s worth checking early in the evaluation process. Rust doesn’t mean the gun is a dud, but it is a concern. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Review: Remington 870 Tac-14 Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 A Hard Kicker? Excessive recoil from an 1100 can be a sign of improper mating between the barrel and the rest of the gas system. The problem can be caused by either too much gas pressure or too little. Excessive pressure will open the breech too quickly while there is too much pressure still in the barrel, allowing the breech to blow back so hard that it gives excessive kick. Swelling of the fired shell is a sign of the breech’s opening early and showing excessive gas flow. Insufficient gas pressure allows the breech to remain locked too long, giving the shooter the same recoil of a pump or other locked-breech shotgun. Low pressure often leads to a short stroke of the action. This will show up as improper or soft ejection and other feeding problems. Cleaning the gas ports will sometimes take care of this. Seal Check Always check the barrel seal to be sure the piston and piston seal are on right. The piston seal goes on first, with the flat base fitting snug against the front face of the action-bar assembly and the angle cut facing the muzzle. The gas piston goes on next, with its angle cut facing into the matching angle of its seal. The rubber barrel seal then goes on, and should fit the magazine tube tightly. When slipped down to the notch in the magazine tube, it will still be tight. These seals need to be replaced if they are frayed, flattened, or stretched. Many owners will stretch these onto the front flat edge of the piston, or put them on in the wrong assembly order.

Armaspec XPDW Stock

Armaspec XPDW Stock

The Armaspec XPDW stock was released at SHOT Show 2016 in Las Vegas this past January and once I saw it I was hoping I would get to try one on my Noveske short barrel rifle. Well wishes sometimes come true as I opened my mailbox on an ordinary Thursday afternoon and found an unexpected package. The Armaspec XPDW rifle stock. There are many different options for AR15 owners when it comes to rifle stocks. Magpul , Vitor , B5 Systems , and Mission First Tactical to name a few. Now you can add Armaspec to the growing list of manufacturers. Each manufacturer has its own merits, some hold batteries, some are easy to adjust, some produced standard military grade adjustable stocks. Armaspec went a different route with there XPDW stock, they used a different twist on the approach. This stock is brand new, I literally received it yesterday as I write this to get word out to you, our readers. It’s a bit heavy but seems to be built like a tank. I was really excited to get it especially since I wasn’t aware it was even coming. Several things aside from the weight of the stock stood out to me, but first lets look at the specs and the break down of the XPDW Stock. Specifications: Weight: 16.06 Ounces Lengths: Closed Length: 6.875″ Fully Open Length: 10.0″ Number of length positions: five total Warranty: Lifetime Materials: Body and butt pad: Aluminum Guide and support rods: Hardened Steel Special Features: Quick detach point on butt pad Uses standard Mil-Spec buffer tube No special tools, buffer or springs needed Made in U.S.A. (who doesn’t love that) Initial Impressions: My initial impression is that this stock is heavier than other stocks I’ve tried but it’s built like a brick. The butt pad assembly uses an ambidextrous button to release and it slides effortlessly. The stock does however stop at each of the five strops along the rail for easy adjustment on the fly. Installation on any Mil-Spec AR15 buffer tube takes less than two minutes. I demonstrated this in the below video. Looking over the stock at first I thought it was missing a sling point and was going to note that in the review until I saw a hole in the bottom of the stock and decided to try to insert a quick detach sling point in the, and PRESTO , it worked. I then read the literature provided and checked the Armaspec company web site and yes they didn’t forget the quick detach sling point. Testing and Videos This stock will be tested in the very near future on my Noveske 10.5″ short barrel rifle. I have to take the SBR out to try out new optics and a new Geissele Mk IV rail anyway so why not try a bunch of stuff at once. I fully intend to drop this, scratch it, and test its impact resistance in lots of imaginative ways I assure you. Here is a quick install and overview video until I get out to the range. If there are any tests you would like to see on this stock drop us a line in the comments section below or use the FRAGO and we will be happy to try them out, unless it will destroy my SBR in the process.

Sighting-In for 3-Gun

Sighting-In for 3-Gun

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d951c867_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d951c867_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The country's hottest practical shooting competition continues to grow. If you are looking to get in on the fun, TRUGLO offers one-stop shopping for all your pistol, shotgun, and AR sighting needs. If you do it, you already know. If you don't, you'll find out as soon as try it…3-gun competitions are a blast. Not only do 3-gun matches scratch that itch we all have to get out on the range, but participation in this popular and ever-growing sport has real-world benefits the likes of which you just can't get from static range shooting. The practice of engaging multiple courses of fire with your three primary defensive weapons—pistol, shotgun, and semi-automatic rifle—allows you to hone your self-defense skills. What's more, the trio of weapons you may use on a 3-gun course can be the same ones you employ for your daily personal and home defense. Getting into 3-gun shooting is simple. All you need is a pistol in 9mm or larger chamber, a pump or semi-auto shotgun in .20- or 12-gauge, and, for most divisions, a .223 chamber semi-auto rifle, the most popular of which is the AR-15 platform. From there, it's a matter of refining your weapons to suit your needs while staying within the rules for the division in which you want to participate. If you have questions, there are many resources to help you get started, including your local participating gun range or shooting club. The 3-gun fraternity is a friendly lot, and experienced shooters enjoy every opportunity to help new shooters get involved in the sport. Although 3-gun equipment rules are in place, they are fairly simple—especially when compared to some competitive shooting associations. One area where the rules are fairly straightforward involves sights and optics; depending on the division in which you chose to participate, no magnified optics are allowed or one magnified optic is allowed in your 3-gun set. Related GunDigest Articles Video: Firearm Reliability in 3-Gun Competition First Look: FN 15 Competition Rifle Competition Bred: Armalite M-15 3-Gun Rifle For those of you who are ready to give 3-gun competition a try, these three products will get your gear ready for the buzzer. TFX ™ Pro Pistol Sights If you've done any serious pistol shooting, you know that your original equipment front and rear sights do not provide an ideal sight picture in all lighting conditions. The TRUGLO TFX™ Pro tritium/fiber optic day/night sights, however, work in all lighting conditions, such as you will often find on a 3-gun course. The advantage the TFX™ Pro sights have over conventional open sights, fiber optic-only sights, or tritium-only sights is that they combine Swiss tritium and fiber optics with a contrasting color front sight ring. This combination provides optimal sight picture acquisition whether you're shooting with a high-noon sun overhead or you are on a woodland course darkened by storm clouds. What's more, the tritium/fiber optic elements are encased in almost indestructible, hermetically sealed capsules that won't be compromised by oils and cleaning solvents. Another advantage these sights have for the 3-gun shooter is their radiused, snag-proof design, which allows you to draw and holster your pistol smoothly and quickly. TRU •BEAD Turkey Universal Sights You're probably thinking, “A turkey sight for a tactical shotgun?” Well, listen up. Three-gun courses are increasingly diversifying their courses of fire, and this includes the shotgun courses. In a shotgun course, you may encounter everything from close-quarter target “hosing” with #6s or 75-yard slug targets. As a result, you need an equally diverse sighting system. An ideal middle-ground sight is the TRUGLO TRU•BEAD™ Turkey Universal. You can use the orange fiber optic front sight to focus on your close-range targets. When it's time to send a chunk of lead far downrange, the contrasting color rear sights will give you precise targeting. Of course, the rear sights are adjustable for elevation and windage, so you'll know the steel is in trouble as soon as you hit the stage.

[Review] Vaultek Safes: VT10i & VT20i

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking for a robust gun safe that looks like it’s from the future? VT10i with 1911 Let your fingerprints and phone do the talking with Vaultek’s biometric safes. Vaultek VT20i (L, black) and VT10i (R, white) I’ll go over the features of both the VT10i ($245) and larger VT20i ($269) safes.  Plus a bunch of pros/cons and whether or not it might satisfy your specific security needs. And now…the Vaultek made our video of best handgun safes for quick access: Now let’s get to it! Unboxing Normally I couldn’t care less about the boxes of my products.  Some of my favorite accessories and guns have come in less than stellar packaging. Vaultek Unboxing But not the Vaultek. It’s one of those un-boxings where you wouldn’t be surprised to hear some heavenly music play in the background. Vaultek Accessories Along with the safe, you get everything you’ll need: 2 physical keys Charger and usb cable Battery with magnetic screwdriver (helpful since the small screw to the battery latch is tiny) 4 ft steel cable + screws for securing to stuff Setup Setting up was a breeze when my wife and I both each set up one of the safes.  The instructions were comprehensible and within a few minutes we were up and running (the battery it came with was 3/4 charged). Vaultek Easy Instructions Sample We set up a numbered combo… Vaultek Opening with Combo Easily added in some fingerprints… Vaultek Opening with Finger And even connected via Bluetooth with their app .  Don’t worry…it’s protected by a pattern you set up first when the safe is open.  You can also choose which safe to open in the app so if you have more than one Vaultek you’re good to go. Vaultek Opening with App What Does It Fit? A safe is useless if if can’t fit what you need. The VT20i is the larger of the two and can fit pretty much the largest full-sized handgun you can throw at it.  Plus ~3 mags. Exterior Dimensions: 11.5” x 9.0” x 2.75” Interior Dimensions: 11.0” x 5.75” x 2.0” Weight: 7.2 lbs It fit my 4-inch S&W 686+ revolver with ease.  Check the reviews and pics here for more specific models. VT20i with S&W 686+ 4-inch While the smaller VT10i had some trouble with the revolver. Exterior Dimensions: 10.55” x 8.46” x 2” Interior dimensions: 9.8” x 5.25” x 1.5” Weight: 5.2 lbs [ 28% Lighter ] VT10i with S&W 686+ 4-inch But with the size reduction you also save some width vs the VT20i. VT20i vs VT10i Thickness It does, however, have tons of space for valuables and more normal semi-auto handguns…even the full-sized ones. VT10i with Stuff You’ll likely only be able to fit one extra mag or two on the side depending on your firearm of choice in the VT10i.  A full-sized Glock 17 can fit at least one extra mag. VT10i with Glock 17 While a compact Glock 19 can hold 2 extra mags with room to spare. VT10i with Glock 19 And slightly larger guns will need to be tilted: VT10i with CZ SP-01 And can hold one extra mag easily.  Check out here for more pictures of other people’s specific guns. VT10i with 1911 Now onto the nitty gritty… Pros Master code programming opens the safe very fast. If you make a mistake in programming, it’s easy to fix. There’s a light inside the safe that turns on for 10 seconds. Numbers light up when you brush your fingers on the keypad so you can see it in the dark.  Very cool feature.  However, my hands are dry so that didn’t work for me all the time. Comes with mounting screws and also steel cable: Vaultek Cable Attachment Very advanced “smart” safe with various different functions and settings. Great app that also lets you change settings: Vaultek App Plus also allows you to see the entire history log and who logged in how: Comes with 2 master keys if you don’t want to use all the fancy functions. Fingerprint functions allows you to add multiple users and you don’t need to worry about everyone remembering the passcode to the safe. Easy to setup.  Instructions were fairly simple. Love the 1 page quick start guide. Very solid frame that is sealed tight making it hard for anyone to pry it open.  I can’t even put a piece of paper through it. Very durable as shown… Vaultek Abuse, Greenlight Shooting Cons Charging Since there are electronics…the safe needs to be charged periodically in order for all functions to work (a 2.5 hour charge via USB will be enough for 4 months).  You can check on the status of the battery through the app. However, there are 2 master keys which can be used if all else fails.  But that means you will need to have the key with you in a safe location you can access if this happens. Fingerprint Reading The fingerprint reader is not 100% reliable…maybe 90% for me. I tested the fingerprint tons of times and sometimes it didn’t work even when my finger was placed exactly in the right spot. I also realized that when my fingers were slightly wet from sweat…it didn’t work. The buttons, however, were 100% reliable. Other Models Vaultek seems to always be coming out with new models…I can’t keep up! Non-biometric versions of the VT20i and VT10i we reviewed which are much more affordable PRO Series : Larger capacity and now 5 ways to enter (addition of a smart key) PRO MX Series : Even larger capacity (8 handguns) and 5 ways to enter ( full review here ) Vaultek Pro MXi Overall Thoughts Vaultek made a great safe with the VT20i ($269) and VT10i ($245).  It’s sleek, packed full of features, and robust. Vaultek VT10i 244 at Vaultek Store Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 244 at Vaultek Store Compare prices (2 found) Vaultek Store (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing But…you’ll have to ask yourself if the features are what you’re looking for in a safe. Vaultek VT20i 269 at Vaultek Store Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 269 at Vaultek Store Compare prices (3 found) Vaultek Store (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing If your focus is on 100% dependability when something goes bump in the night? Stick with the number code instead of the fingerprint reader.  There’s also the models that don’t have the reader and are much cheaper. For home protection, I’m still going to stick with something mechanical like my favorite bed-stand safe that is dead simple to operate and will never run out of batteries. Fort Knox FTK-PB Simplex Handgun Safe But if you require ease of access for several people, monitoring/disabling of access, and something that looks sexy…Vaultek is for you. VT10i with Glock 19 I’m still definitely keeping mine for access to valuables and non-home-protection guns. It’s also going to be my go-to travel safe since the VT10i isn’t too burdensome, comes with a cable, and has tamper recognition. Did I mention…it comes in camo for a little more? Vaultek Camo, I only see a hand and glass desk So…are you going to get a Vaultek?  Or are you sticking with your old safe?  Check out our list of the Best Safes for Pistols and Handguns if you’re looking for more capacity…or going old-school.

Modern Shooter: Custom Advantage With H&H Precision Rifles

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d0179747_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d0179747_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Find out how to go the extra mile with a custom rifle on the next Modern Shooter. Why go custom ? It’s a legitimate question, given the state of today’s firearms manufacturing, which in a word is “excellent.” Examples of off-the-shelf tack drivers are legion and, expense-wise, within most if not all riflemen’s reach. If you’re aiming to hit the mark 500-yards out, almost everything made today with a bolt-action and in an appropriate caliber will get the job done — consistently. If your goal is a half-mile or better, then an entirely different tool is required. These extreme ranges are where the ten-thousandth-of-an-inch tolerances on a custom rig like the ones turned out by H&H Precision Rifles payoff. And the results of this minute attention to detail are spectacular. The right optics and proper understanding of ballistics, sending a round dead on target a couple ridges over, time-and-time again, is more than doable, it’s an out-and-out reality. Related GunDigest Articles Modern Shooter: Surviving At Extremely Close Quarters Modern Shooter: H&H Precision Rifle's Shooting School Modern Shooter: 500-Yard Pokes At A Moving Target A tour and trigger time with the H&H Precision crew made Luke Hartle a believer. Then again, striking a metal plate at 1,400 yards tends to hold conversion powers akin to those found on the road to Damascus. Though, the Editor-in-Chief of Gun Digest the Magazine isn’t changing his name to “Paul” anytime soon, he is more than happy to preach the extra dollars spent in going with a finely tailored rig is far from money wasted. It’s an investment, guaranteed to pay off every time you squeeze the trigger.

Summary

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